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Brain Injury Alliance of Arizona Blog

Lexi Wolfe Brings Passion for Physical Medicine and Rehab to Young Professional Advisory Council

Lexi Wolfe is the newest member of the at the Brain Injury Alliance of Arizona’s Young Professionals Brain Health Advisory Council. It’s the latest step in her blossoming career treating people with brain injuries.

Currently a senior at Midwestern University med school, the 26-year-old Minneapolis native received her B.S. in Kinesiology from the University of Minnesota. It was there she felt the calling to this field.

“Everybody here at the Brain Injury Alliance has been so welcoming. They value my input as an up-and-coming professional. I anticipate this council will make quite an impact with new approaches to improving brain health throughout the state.”

Lexi Wolfe Brings Passion for Physical Medicine and Rehab to Young Professional Advisory Council

Lexi Wolfe is the newest member of the at the Brain Injury Alliance of Arizona’s Young Professionals Brain Health Advisory Council. It’s the latest step in her blossoming career treating people with brain injuries.

Currently a senior at Midwestern University med school, the 26-year-old Minneapolis native received her B.S. in Kinesiology from the University of Minnesota. It was there she felt the calling to this field.

“Everybody here at the Brain Injury Alliance has been so welcoming. They value my input as an up-and-coming professional. I anticipate this council will make quite an impact with new approaches to improving brain health throughout the state.”

Throughout her four undergraduate years and gap year, Lexi worked for a group home, caring for individuals with disabilities, half of whom had brain injuries. Starting as a personal care attendant, she eventually became residential supervisor assistant of the home.

“I found the experience to be incredibly rewarding,” says Lexi. “I had the opportunity to advocate for individuals to make sure they had a good quality of life. I was particularly interested in the care they received.” By joining brain injury survivors on doctors’ appointments, she was able to understand first-hand the kind of treatment they were getting.

“Seeing how medicine improved their functionality is what really got me interested in medicine,” she shares. “I knew physical medicine and rehabilitation would be my career path.”

At Midwestern, she sought ways to become even more involved with others who shared her passion. When a representative from the Brain Injury Alliance spoke at her school, she jumped at the opportunity to get involved with the organization. Lexi went to the biaaz.org website and discovered ways to participate on both the medical and practical sides.

“I connected with [the Alliance’s [Certified Recovery Support Specialist] Liz Bradley on the Vulnerable Populations Committee and saw what the Brain Injury Alliance was doing for those dealing with substance abuse, the homeless, and people in domestic violence situations,” Lexi tells. “It really opened my eyes and made me want to do more.”

She then accepted an invitation to be a member of the Young Professionals Brain Health Advisory Council (YPBHAC). The group consists of some of the best and brightest minds from a variety of backgrounds and fields, looking for innovative ways to encourage brain health and wellness.

Scot Taggart, the YPBHAC council chair, appreciates the experience and enthusiasm Lexi is bringing to the YPBHAC. “Her passion and insight are just what the community needs. She has also worked with survivors for years and brings great ideas about recovery and prevention to the table.”

Lexi is equally excited. “Everybody here at the Brain Injury Alliance has been so welcoming. They value my input as an up-and-coming professional. I anticipate this council will make quite an impact with new approaches to improving brain health throughout the state.”

As for her non-brain-related interests, Lexi was a competitive swimmer in high school and enjoyed boating on Minnesota’s rivers. Now three years into living in Phoenix, this self-described foodie can still be found outdoors, usually hiking Arizona’s legendary trails.

ABOUT BRAIN INJURY ALLIANCE OF ARIZONA

The Brain Injury Alliance of Arizona (BIAAZ) is the only statewide nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of adults and children with all types of brain injuries through prevention, advocacy, awareness and education. BIAAZ also houses the Arizona Brain Health Resource Center, a collection of educational information and neuro-specific resources for brain injury survivors, caregivers, family members and professionals.

What began in 1983 as a grassroots effort has grown into a strong statewide presence, providing valuable life-long resources and community support for individuals with all types of brain trauma at no charge.

The Brain Injury Alliance of Arizona:

  • Works with Congressional Brain Injury Task Force
  • Houses Arizona Brain Health Resource Center
  • Hosts Statewide Opioid Use Disorder & Cognitive Impairment Workgroup
  • Has Statewide Opioid Use Disorder & Cognitive Impairment Response team with peer support, training, and family wraparound services
  • Facilitates Brain Health Advisory Council
  • Manages statewide Neuro Info-Line: 888-500-9165

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